Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? Philip K. Dick.
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?
Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

New York: Doubleday, 1968. First Edition. Octavo. Item #027481

Originally, Philip K. Dick's focus on androids and ignored animals led to the issue of ethical concerns outside the pure science fiction genre. As the issues of what constitutes the Canon from the older standard views of E.D. Hirsch and Harold Bloom, writers realized literature had crossed artificial boundaries and chief in the debate is Dick's concept of androids which has led to hundreds of scholarly articles. Once Ridley Scott's Blade Runner appeared in 1982 the world between fantasy and the implications of modern science have been blurred. At the end of his book Dick concludes: "electric things have their lives too. Paltry as those lives are." The issues raised by Rachel Carson's Silent Spring and Stegner's "Wilderness Letter" have led both the devotee of great science fiction and the environment to think about the issues Philip K. Dick has raised. A fair copy of ex-library book bound in gray cloth, spine lettering gilt, in a good dust jacket that has not been price-clipped but with a few small spots of rubbing, tape residue to bottom edge and circular sticker to the underside of both flaps, front and rear pastedowns with circular sticker residue, circular stain, with library stamp and bookplate removal residue, binding is heavily rubbed.

Price: $1,150.00

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