Letter By [John M.] J.M. Broadhead to Major J.C. Cash, P.M.M. Corps, Washington, D.C., 1863. 2nd. June 18 U S. Treasury Department. Comptroller's Office, 1863.
Letter By [John M.] J.M. Broadhead to Major J.C. Cash, P.M.M. Corps, Washington, D.C., 1863

Letter By [John M.] J.M. Broadhead to Major J.C. Cash, P.M.M. Corps, Washington, D.C., 1863

Item #027392

Bifolium. The Union Army in the Civil War was faced with the issue of granting leave to those who had to return home in cases of emergencies (other than illness or wounds). It had to distinguish between loneliness for home versus family issues or the death of a parent, sibling, or wife. It was determined that they would receive "half of the pay and allowances by law" but if an officer was absent without leave, he would face the full penalties prescribed by law or a Court-martial, (and) forfeit all pay or allowances during such absence. J.M. Broadhead here writes a 38 line interpretation of the newly enacted law. He notes in his interpretation that Congress did not distinguish between short or long granted leaves of absence and he notes this would apply to both the Army and the Navy. He says that it is so clear and wide sweeping that while it may render difficulty in some cases, it is unmistakably clear. He further notes this applies to the Marine Corps. He notes this law was to remedy the problem of absences from the Army which heretofore had been in a grey area. Documents from the Treasury Department (which had been reconstituted in 1862) or rare. J.M. Brodhead continued long after the ending of the War in charge of the 2nd Controller's Office. J.C Cash began as a 1st Lt in the Marines on the U.S. Steamer Saranac. By the middle of the Civil War he was the Paymaster for the Marines. Here he inquires on a technical issue but one of major importance as both the placement of the members of the Armed Forces as well as their proper compensation was an issue that had to be clarified as the war continued.

Price: $250.00