Emancipation in the West Indies: a Six Months Tour in Antigua, Barbados and Jamaica in the Year 1837

Emancipation in the West Indies: a Six Months Tour in Antigua, Barbados and Jamaica in the Year 1837

New York: American Anti-Slavery Society, 1838. First Edition. Octavo. Item #026102

xi, 489 pages. More than 600,000 women signed a petition to end the so-called "apprentice system" in an appeal directly to Queen Victoria. While some of the smaller editions were issued by the Anti-slavery examiner with only 128 pages (and a few at 32 pages) this is the largest edition with an index. As in most copies, the map was not included in this edition though the index has been expanded. The Appendix also has the records of why the sugar market It shows that once the slaves were emancipated, the markets for sugar, rum, coffee and other products actually increased. This is one of the reasons the Southern Planters sought to destroy copies of this book. In other words, if its conclusions were correct the abolition of slavery would ultimately be beneficial from an economic point of view. The authors, of course, did not understand the deepest fears of the Southern aristocracy that saw any abridgement of the Southern way of life as detrimental to all that was good. Even the poorest dirt farmer who could not afford to buy a slave longed for enough wealth to have slaves to help him rise to the wealth from the cotton market. Bound in the original embossed cloth, light wear along edges but overall in good condition with chipping to spine ends some scattered foxing.

Price: $125.00

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