The Utah Expedition, 1857-1858; Letters of. Jesse A. Gove, Otis Grand Hammond.
The Utah Expedition, 1857-1858; Letters of

The Utah Expedition, 1857-1858; Letters of

Concord, N.H. New Hampshire Historical Society, 1928. Octavo. Item #025050

443 pages, frontispiece, illustrations, plates. One of the most important of the first hand accounts of the "Utah War" when the U.S. Army marched for 1500 miles to quell rebellious Mormons. Brigham Young claimed that they were persecuted by "the Gentiles" and they did not have to submit to becoming part of the territory acquired from Mexico. Even the absentee landlord President James Buchanan reacted to what was known as "the Mormon rebellion." From James Bridger to Henry Sibley, we get an enlisted man's experiences from the books he is requesting (Dickens' Little Dorrit once all parts are complete and it can be bound up) to the Mormons praying that God will stop the army in its tracks [apparently He didn't] to the declaration of Brigham Young that Utah was not part of the United States and that when the army arrived it would all be scalped by the Indians (another of the Prophet's mistaken prophecies). There is so much on the Mormons of the time regarding their aggressive attempts at converting Gentiles (claiming that their wives might then be connected to the Prophet). Of course, much of what he had heard were overblown but there is an account of a public speech of Brigham Young where he said anyone could leave who did not want to be under their control. Then, there is a list on page. 291-2 of all those who wished to leave against the prophet's command. He then shows the outline of the roads surrounding the fort and how the rock formations are that make the roads difficult to construct. He then speaks of Captain Marcy's arrival. He proceeds to describe a number of the Mormon settlements. In short, a fascinating account of Utah before is subjugation by the U.S. army. Bound in black cloth, spine lettering gilt. Some staining to cloth. A very good copy.

Price: $125.00