Japan on the Upward Trail. William Axling.
Japan on the Upward Trail

Japan on the Upward Trail

New York: Missionary Education Movement, 1923. First Edition. Small Octavo. Item #014164

180p. Bibliography. The author was well-intentioned as he believed his missionary activity would bring the "light" to the Japanese people. However, as often happens when church and governments become intermixed, the religious people become instruments for propaganda. Clearly that is the case here. First, there is a laudatory statement by the author of what he was told from Admiral Baron Kato. What follows is a statement from Prince Tokugawa, President of the House of Peers noting that Japan "is not militaristic" and offers the prospect of "a lasting peace" as evidence by the "drastic retrenchment both in her Army and Navy." The Japanese Ambassador to the US, Mananao Hanihara, assures the reader "to deserve the good-will of her neighbors across the Pacific: There are a number of black and white photographs of interest. One shows a baseball game between a Japanese team and an unnamed college team from the U.S., another of a slum in Tokyo, and still another of a plant where 6,000 Japanese women worked in what clearly would be horrible work in a factory. The missionary writer in his enthusiasm for success with the gospel message has clearly missed what Homer Lea saw a generation earlier--the Japanese were courting the favor of the US but were preparing for a conflict that would be inevitable. Bound in pictorial paper wraps, upper wrapper appears to have been repaired. A good copy.

Price: $25.00